Bootstrap your EdTech

“Bootstrap” your EdTech

 

To “bootstrap” indicates to get started, develop, or create under one’s own efforts, finances, maybe even, ingenuity, with little or no assistance from others.

 

We often hear about entrepreneurs and start-up companies that “bootstrapped” it until they “made it.”  It’s a good term.  It’s relevant.  Additionally, Bootstrap is actually a “mobile first” front-end development tool for HTML, CSS, and JS.

 

There is an overwhelming amount of educational technology available to choose from for students, teachers, and administrators.

First, start with why.

 

Is there really a need for all of these tools?  In my opinion, yes.   There are certain online programs that provide value that are worth the cost, effort, and implementation.  Programs that allow for personalized learning paths, that are “adaptive” and personalized – remediating, or advancing, a student “real-time” – and those that provide educators invaluable analytics and insight into a child’s performance and mastery towards standards.  There’s also some awesome programs that facilitate creativity, collaboration, and discussion among students.

 

However, there is redundancy among many of the edtech tools that we have access to. So, continue to evaluate if your students and teachers are getting value from those online programs that you use.

 

Then, “bootstrap”, the rest.  What I mean by this, is utilize the free online tools that bring a lot of value.  Ask yourself, “Are you fully utilizing the online programs that are free?”

 

One of the biggest players in the truly free for educators market is G Suite for Education.  With a bit of creativity and understanding of the power of GSfE, you can implement everything from blended learning to differentiated instruction to collaboration and interaction with your community.

 

Here’s a few tips and concrete examples:

 

 

  • Google Hangouts: Find and develop connections in your curriculum/content to local (or global) specialists willing to share some relevant experiences.

 

      • Here’s an example: fifth graders engaged with nurse practitioners and transplant coordinators from The Lung Transplant Program at New York-Columbia Presbyterian University Medical Center to learn more about the respiratory system as part of their science curriculum.

 

  • Google Docs/Slides: Manage formative assessment feedback and comments using Action Items.

 

  • Google Forms: Have students create surveys for projects.
  • Google Sites: Almost limitless.
  • Create a site that stores all of your curated resources, videos, links, Docs, Slides, Forms, assessments, etc. for a project.  Facilitate student self-paced activities, blended learning, and share your created or approved instructional content through a Site.

 

      • Student created portfolio sites.  Create the opportunity for students to share the work they are proud of throughout the year.  Students will surprise you with their creativity and engagement when you simply give them a platform to express themselves.
      • Create a teacher site.  Make this as simple or robust as you would like. The canvas is blank for your creation.

 

 

 

Beyond Google for Education there are so many edtech tools that can enhance instruction, increase student engagement, and personalize and differentiate learning.

Without diving deep into these tools, here’s a bunch of online programs that are free for teachers:

 

Curiosity Machine

 

Khan Academy

 

The Lawrence Hall of Science

 

Math IXL (limited free for teachers)

 

Matific

 

National Science Teachers Associations

 

National Science Digital Library (NSDL)

 

Padlet

 

PBS Learning Science

 

Pear Deck

 

Peergrade

 

Science Interactives

 

TenMarks (limited free for teachers)

 

Smithsonian Education

 

Understanding Science

Organizing Google Drive & Archiving Google Classroom

Organizing Google Drive & Archiving in Google Classroom
Organizing Google Drive & Archiving in Google Classroom

As we head into the middle of July and summer vacations, I thought this would be a good time to share some tips for organizing Google Drive.  This is a perfect rainy day activity when you have a few moments (easier said than done).

Most of us (myself included) probably didn’t start off with organizational “best practices,” like naming conventions and folder structure when we started working on Google Drive.  Over the years I’ve organized Google Drive as I went along.

We’ll go over a few tips that you can do to start organizing Drive.  Not all of these will work for you and your preferences.  Your organization really boils down to what works for you, your personal preferences, and organization techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

My tips for organizing Google Drive summary:

1. Folder structure

2. File naming convention

3. Color code folders

4. Organize important shared docs/files

5. Utilize the info button/icon and use sort functions

Additionally, below is a short demo video for Archiving a Class in Google Classroom.  This is a super simple process, but worth a look if you’re not sure where to start.

You’ll also find a slideshow a for step-by-step instructions on this process here – Google Classroom – Archiving a Class.

Thanks for reading and watching!