Teaching Reflection

Teaching Reflection.

The concept of “How” do I …?” is often a discussion for educators and students.  “How do I … ?” fill in the blank … “solve this word problem,” “write this conclusion,” or the thousands of examples in which teachers explain, model, and demonstrate for students how to do something.  As we close the school year, perhaps we show students how to “reflect on the year.”  I would agree that the “How?” of learning is possibly one of the most important skills.  Students need to learn how to learn and develop metacognition.  With our help, they can develop perseverance, develop grit, and work through the struggles and failures of learning.  However, I believe we must start with “Why?” and finish with reflections about their “Why?” This is probably the most important aspect to model and discuss with students.  This year, we were proud to see our students in all of our schools set and work towards personal goals.  The teachers and students are certainly reflecting on those goals as we approach the end of our school year (and some are possibly setting new ones for the summer and for next school year).  

Here are some ideas to finish the year strong:

  • Lead reflective discussions (perhaps use Pear Deck since teachers control whether responses are displayed for the class, plus they’re displayed anonymously)
  • Share your own personal life lessons on setting, achieving and/or not reaching goals
  • Discuss favorite or memorable lessons and ask students to explain why they were so memorable (this will help show that you are reflecting as a teacher on how you can make lessons better for students)
  • Have students create bulletin board or whiteboard wall art that explains, “Tips for “incoming” students.”
  • Consider tracking goals using Sheets and Docs – perhaps students can track some type of personal progress over the summer
  • Watch and discuss Angela Duckworth’s TED Talk – “Grit: The power of passion and perseverance”
  • Have individual student-led conferences to help students finish strong
  • Create a “Pride Wall” for goal achievements where students can share their accomplishments

 

In the end, start with “Why,” and continue to come back to that throughout the year.  

Plan – Do – Check – Act – it’s all a process, especially for learning.

Data Informed

Data informs every aspect of decision-making.  The flowchart below is a look at how data collection, asking questions, finding answers (not the answers you want, but discovering what the data says) informs everything from “What do our teachers value?” to “Why and how should we pilot a new program?” to “What professional development does our staff want and need?”

 

 

Organizing Google Drive & Archiving Google Classroom

Organizing Google Drive & Archiving in Google Classroom
Organizing Google Drive & Archiving in Google Classroom

As we head into the middle of July and summer vacations, I thought this would be a good time to share some tips for organizing Google Drive.  This is a perfect rainy day activity when you have a few moments (easier said than done).

Most of us (myself included) probably didn’t start off with organizational “best practices,” like naming conventions and folder structure when we started working on Google Drive.  Over the years I’ve organized Google Drive as I went along.

We’ll go over a few tips that you can do to start organizing Drive.  Not all of these will work for you and your preferences.  Your organization really boils down to what works for you, your personal preferences, and organization techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

My tips for organizing Google Drive summary:

1. Folder structure

2. File naming convention

3. Color code folders

4. Organize important shared docs/files

5. Utilize the info button/icon and use sort functions

Additionally, below is a short demo video for Archiving a Class in Google Classroom.  This is a super simple process, but worth a look if you’re not sure where to start.

You’ll also find a slideshow a for step-by-step instructions on this process here – Google Classroom – Archiving a Class.

Thanks for reading and watching!