Quotes I’m pondering …

“If you want your children to turn out well, spend twice as much time with them and half as much money.” – Abigail Van Buren

“Enjoy the little things in life because one day you’ll look back and realize they were the big things.” – Kurt Vonnegut

“It’s not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters.” – Epictetus

“Time and patience are the strongest warriors.” – Leo Tolstoy

“Don’t quit. Never give up trying to build the world you can see, even if others can’t see it. Listen to your drum and your drum only. It’s the one that makes the sweetest sound.” – Simon Sinek

“A day’s work is your chance to do art, to create a gift, to do something that matters.” – Seth Godin

The Learning Lab Podcast

By doing this project, I am embracing the fear, ambiguity, and challenges of starting something like this. I am enjoying the excitement and energy of starting something that has the potential to make a positive impact. 

I haven’t shared this project with many, but every time I do, I am excited and interested in the feedback.

So, here it is – https://www.thelearninglab.live/podcast/

WHO’S IT FOR?

A podcast for students interested in career exploration – middle schoolers, high schoolers, or college students (even career changers) – and those that are simply curious about different careers, paths, and the work that people do.

WHAT’S IT FOR?

The podcast is for learning the inside scoop on various careers, but particularly learning about the work directly from someone who does the work today.  Plus, we discuss the learning processes involved and each person’s unique learning and career path.

Let’s get learning.

Share and/or subscribe on Apple podcasts.

Share and/or subscribe on Anchor.FM

Share and/or subscribe on Stitcher podcasts.

What are your questions?

I’m going to attempt to connect some dots here.

I love it when I see a classroom environment that promotes wonder, questioning, and discovery among students.  Check out Launch by AJ Juliani and John Spencer for more on this topic.  But, here’s a quote that really stuck with me: “Sometimes the bravest thing you can do is ask a question.”

I’m going to attempt to make a connection to a few assertions by Brene Brown, (Dare to Lead and Braving the Wilderness, among others) – that “Courage starts with showing up, and letting ourselves be seen.”

In the classroom, that courage can simply start with a question.  But, how many times do students literally fear asking a question, and being vulnerable in front of their peers? How often do we feel this way?

Borrowing another quote from Brene Brown: “Vulnerability is the birthplace of innovation, creativity, and change.” 

So, if we truly encourage an environment of “wonder and discovery” in schools and classrooms, we need the courage to be vulnerable and ask questions that lead to the innovation or transformation we seek. 

And, as one of my colleagues so poignantly put it, we need to say, “What are your questions?”

Go.

Flow state.

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The other day I was fortunate to surf some beautiful, fun waves right up the road from my home here in NJ.  Picture four foot, clean, steep, and fast breaking waves.  An offshore wind, holding the wave face open for a surfer to sneak a little tube (or cover up by the wave face).  I felt like I couldn’t stop surfing. My friends left after awhile. It just continued to stay fun.  Time slipped by.  I ended up surfing for four hours.  My brain wanted to keep going, but I had to go in for food, water, and to warm up. 

I had another experience recently where time literally slipped by.  Email and notifications were off.  I planned to work on a presentation for an hour.  Time slipped by.  I was in the flow.  Creating, writing, making.

Over an hour later, the phone rang. I had snapped out of it.  It was my scheduled call with a vendor for one of our programs. I quickly refocused my attention to the conversation and later continued on with my workday – never getting back to a flow state that day.

I thought of all of this the other day after a discussion with some educators.

How do we create the space for kids to get into a flow state?

To simply get into that state of productive work where time seems to slip away.  A space where they continue learning, reading, practicing, and making for an extended period of time, with little to no interruption. Owning their learning.

I don’t have an answer, this just a riff.

TheLearningLab.live

For years, students have had access to the Internet, social networks, and one-to-one device initiatives in school districts across the country and world. With this access comes a responsibility to engage students in their interests, career aspirations, local and global collaboration, and connect them with current practitioners and thought leaders. This is actually a component of the Future Ready Schools initiative in which schools and districts across the US are pledging to prepare their students to be future ready.

The LearningLab.live’s goal is to create a community of local (and even global) businesses and leaders, non-profits, and educators that will engage students in relevant, authentic, and timely project-based learning opportunities that need completion now. [Hence, the dot live].

The mission: To connect students, teachers, and schools with relevant and authentic project-based learning opportunities, amplified by coaching and collaboration. Now.

To learn more about TheLearningLab.live click here.

To sign up for a “beta” project for the 2018-19 school-year, go here.

By doing this project, I am embracing the fear, ambiguity, and challenges of starting something like this. I am enjoying the excitement and energy of starting something that has the potential to make a positive impact. 

I dare you . . .

I dare you . . .

To learn something new and share it with the world!

What’s the worst that can happen?

Don’t answer that question. The answer is nothing.

When was the last time you learned something new? Whether it was by choice, for school/work, for a project . . . or even, for a practical reason, like something broke and it was just more cost-effective to learn how to repair or replace, and simply do it yourself. When was the last time you really dug in to new learnings?

Nowis the perfect time to learn something new. With so much information at our fingertips, it simply makes sense. Between podcasts, YouTube, online courses found on platforms EdEx, Udemy or Creative Live, or even workshops like the altMBA, there are so many options for on-demand learning.

You can even challenge yourself and learn new skills offline. Try something that connects you with nature, friends, or even strangers. Perhaps a weekly goal of one new hike with an attempt to identify birds or plant species.

Maybe I just can’t sit still for very long, but I really do enjoy self-directed, creative, challenging, and novel learning and projects.

Here are some (new to me) learnings that I explored over the past few weeks:

How to make homemade Kombucha Tea, which sent me on a fermentation kick making homemade sauerkrauts too. It’s tasty, healthy, and way cheaper than buying regularly. 

Operating a new FujiFilm XT-20 mirrorless camera. A new camera with new features is always fun to learn. 

Blogging, putting sustained effort into putting written work out to the world. It’s not perfect, and it may not be for everyone. But, hopefully it’s worthwhile for those that read.

Fishing with my son. (Surprisingly, I was never that into fishing as a kid), but now it’s been fun to learn the intrices and skills. From tying specific knots and using different bait and presentations to catch a specific species of fish, it’s been a fun experience to get outside and occasionally catch dinner.

If you’re interested, stay tuned for two new things that I am in the process of learning and will be sharing with the world in the next week.

Tech-Free Zone

Tech-Free Zone

No phones allowed here. 

For the most part, technology is good and making our lives more efficient, easier, more connected, and creating more opportunity.

I think kids today have the opportunity to learn faster than any generation before them simply due to access to information and adaptive/personalized learning technologies.

However, we have to teach “technology etiquette and balance” along with the empathy and communication skills needed for in-person interactions. There are different and new skills to learn now, like how to balance online and “real life,” in-person relationships or how to turn off the phone and be present with those you are with.

We need to teach a balanced use of technology and a responsible use of technology. We should consider “technology-free zones and times” in our schools and homes. Kids today might have more opportunity, but there’s more responsibility that comes with access to a platform to interact with the world at the click of a button. Click here for more ideas.

Do you create technology-free zones or times in your life?