Adaptive Learning Flowchart for Google Forms

I wanted to share this Adaptive Learning Flowchart that can be used when planning a formative assessment in Google Forms.

I don’t recommend trying to make Google Form assessment that verges on the complexity of advanced adaptive learning programs.  However, the flowchart I’ve provided should give you some assistance in planning a form that leads a student through a differentiated path or an adaptive type assessment.

 

Flowchart Graphic
Flowchart Graphic

Valuable Student Feedback

student growth

Students need feedback, compliments and constructive criticism on their progress and learning process.  If you’re going to dish out compliments, make sure they are not empty compliments to students filled with generalities like, “You’re so smart,” or “Great job!”  Students will value and respect teachers that are honest, fair, and provide (age appropriate) feedback that they can work with, grow from, and understand.  I also believe this will facilitate trust between the teacher and the student so that the child will be more open to constructive criticism and feedback during the times when the student is challenged.

Try the following as examples.

“You did great work on this project because you provided evidence that underscored your arguments. Additionally, you cited more than the required number of sources.”

“These word problems were challenging; you answered a few questions correctly, let’s discuss why.  On some other problems, you made some errors, let’s see if we can find out where you went wrong.”

“It’s not clear what you mean in the highlighted sentence.  Can you reword this? … Are you trying to say _________?  If so, consider rewording the sentence like this ______________.”engage students in opportunities to reflect on the learning process, ask questions, give specific feedback

  • Engage students in opportunities to reflect on the learning process
  • Ask questions of the student
  • Give specific feedback (link to rubrics/expectations)
  • Don’t praise intelligence, rather the specific work
  • Don’t praise trivial accomplishments/weak efforts
  • Encourage reflection, goal setting, and regularly check in with students on progress towards goals

Organizing Google Drive & Archiving Google Classroom

Organizing Google Drive & Archiving in Google Classroom
Organizing Google Drive & Archiving in Google Classroom

As we head into the middle of July and summer vacations, I thought this would be a good time to share some tips for organizing Google Drive.  This is a perfect rainy day activity when you have a few moments (easier said than done).

Most of us (myself included) probably didn’t start off with organizational “best practices,” like naming conventions and folder structure when we started working on Google Drive.  Over the years I’ve organized Google Drive as I went along.

We’ll go over a few tips that you can do to start organizing Drive.  Not all of these will work for you and your preferences.  Your organization really boils down to what works for you, your personal preferences, and organization techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

My tips for organizing Google Drive summary:

1. Folder structure

2. File naming convention

3. Color code folders

4. Organize important shared docs/files

5. Utilize the info button/icon and use sort functions

Additionally, below is a short demo video for Archiving a Class in Google Classroom.  This is a super simple process, but worth a look if you’re not sure where to start.

You’ll also find a slideshow a for step-by-step instructions on this process here – Google Classroom – Archiving a Class.

Thanks for reading and watching!